IT Automation Curator for DevOps – Part 2 – Collect and Catalog

This topic is far too interesting and deep to cover in just one blog post. So, I am going to split the discussion into a few sections. I’ll use my proposed “job description” for an IT Automation Curator as a starting point:

  • Collect existing automation, and then Catalog it where others can find it
  • Develop new automation based on requirements from IT
  • Train others on how to use the automated processes
  • Maintain the existing automation

This first step of collect and catalog is where I have seen many automation efforts stumble. The natural inclination of most techies (myself included) is to jump right into developing automation, no matter what is in place. As I learned the hard way, that is a bad idea. So, I will give a few reasons why this step is important:

Reason #1: If you don’t know about all the automation in place, you don’t really understand how your data center is operating

It’s great that you developed that new automated process that auto-magically deploys a set of configurations for you. Are you sure that other scripts or tools won’t change it or corrupt it? Most IT teams have scripts strewn all over the place – some well known , some the detritus of sysadmins past. They may have been scheduled centrally or on individual servers. This is very hard to get a grip on. There are a few tools out there, but it is hard to ensure that you have found all automation spread over all the systems. This is just another reason why you need to control access and even re-build some servers from scratch (hopefully in an automated way).

Most IT operations teams also have multiple automation tools in play. Each silo-ed team has their preferred tool, which they guard jealously. Overall, this is not a good approach. The more tools you have, the harder it is to standardize automation and create efficient end-to-end processes. At a minimum, all of these tools need to documented and managed centrally.

Reason #2: Don’t duplicate work and ignore experience

A lot of the automation in place may not be optimal, but it was most likely built to solve the same problems you will need to solve later. Tossing it out, or just ignoring it, is essentially disregarding the combined experience of the IT team. Even if you rebuild it in a better tool, and in a more efficient way – the lessons learned will be valuable.

There is also an important less here about prioritization. Just because you can make an automated process more elegant or more efficient, doesn’t mean you should. More often than not you will have no end of automation projects to look at. Why spend your time on what already works? What is important is to apply automation judiciously, where it provides the most value for the business.

Reason #3: More sharing will always lead to better results

Fostering a culture of sharing automation, essentially an open-source culture, will ensure that everyone has access to the best work on offer, that they don’t re-invent the wheel, and it will allow for continual improvement. That last point is crucial. The idea is not for the automation curator to control all the automation per se. They should be catalysts for making better automation, whether they do it or not. So, it is important to leave one’s ego at the door, and admit that your automation becomes better when you let others critique it and improve on it.

Bottom line, having a central place to share and continually improve automation is essential. This will most likely affect your choice of automation platforms as well. If you can’t share and improve, then you will be hobbling yourselves.

So, how do you do this in your own environment? Do you have ideas about the best way to go about it? Any success stories?

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One thought on “IT Automation Curator for DevOps – Part 2 – Collect and Catalog

  1. Pingback: IT Automation Curator for DevOps – Part 2 – Collect and Catalog | robotics | Scoop.it

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